This is not Wikipedia!

When you Google ‘Eurovelo’, there are two places where you will invariably end up visiting; the website of the European Cyclists’ Federation (ECF) and Wikipedia’s entry for Eurovelo. That’s certainly where I was directed when I started to plan my own cycling odyssey along the Eurovelo 5 in 2010. Both of these sites offer valuable information about the network of cycling routes in Europe but in my humble opinion, they are lacking in one key area; the personal touch. There are many people out there who, like me, have a passion for their particular route or routes. Mine is currently the Eurovelo 5 (I’ve even written a book about my experiences cycling from southern England to Brindisi in the south of Italy, Good Vibrations: Crossing Europe on a Bike Called Reggie) and will increasingly be the Eurovelo 8 that I plan to cycle in 2013. People visit this website – www.eurovelo5.com and www.eurovelo8.com to find the kind of information that the ECF and Wikipedia don’t give; advice, opinions, recommendations, links & all the other subjective stuff. I have never claimed to have all the answers to the questions I have been asked, but I am proud of the fact that others who have come this way have told me that via my website they have been encouraged and in some cases even inspired to set off on their own cycling adventure. I can perhaps never hope to produce the wealth of information that I have amassed for the Eurovelo 5 and will hopefully one day have available for the Eurovelo 8 but what I can offer is to offer a home for links to all the websites, books, opinions and people that have been made available by other fans of the Eurovelo network.

I can make a good start with the information I have at hand but if you have a website, if you have written a book, if you have an opinion or anything else that would never find a home on either the ECF or Wikipedia websites, please get in touch and I will make sure it gets a mention here.

Many thanks

Andrew

apsykes@hotmail.com

What do you think?