Cycling

Tour de France 2020: Dates, Stages And Favourites

The 107th Tour de France is just around the corner. Here, Peter Watton, from matched betting specialist OddsMonkey, shares all the essential info you need.

When is the Tour de France 2020?

The Tour de France 2020 is scheduled for 29 August to 20 September. The event was originally planned for 27 June to 19 July but was postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.

What is the route of the Tour de France 2020?

The Tour de France 2020 route travels 3,470km (2,156 miles) over 23 days from the Grand Depart of Nice Moyen Pays to the Paris Champs-Élysées Finale. You can download the map here [PDF].

There are 21 stages in the event, composed of 9 flat stages, 3 hilly stages, 8 mountain stages, and 1 individual time-trial stage. Riders have 2 rest days.

During stages 8 and 9, competitors will visit the summits of six major climbs: Col de Menté (elevation 1,349m), Port de Balès (elevation 1,755m), Col de Peyresourde (elevation 1,569m), Col de la Hourcère (elevation 1,440m), Col de Soudet (elevation 1,540m), and Col de Marie Blanque (elevation 1,035m).

Stage 17 is the Queen Stage, where riders will face a 17.1km, 8.4% climb up Col de la Madeleine prior to the 21.5km, 7.8% summit finish on the Col de la Loze.

Performance in the one-and-only time trial, which acts as the penultimate stage, could prove critical. 

• 29 August: Stage 1 — 156km — Nice Moyen Pays to Nice — Flat

• 30 August: Stage 2 — 187km — Nice Haut Pays to Nice — Mountain

• 31 August: Stage 3 — 198km — Nice to Sisteron — Flat

• 1 September: Stage 4 — 157km — Sisteron to Orcières-Merlette — Hilly

• 2 September: Stage 5 — 183km — Gap to Privas — Flat

• 3 September: Stage 6 — 191km — Le Teil to Mont Aigoual — Hilly

• 4 September: Stage 7 — 168km — Millau to Lavaur — Flat

• 5 September: Stage 8 — 140km — Cazères-sur-Garonne to Loudenvielle — Mountain

• 6 September: Stage 9 — 154km — Pau to Laruns — Mountain

• 7 September: Rest — La Charente-Maritime

• 8 September: Stage 10 — 170km — Île d’Oléron Le Château-d’Oléron to Île de Ré Saint-Martin-de-Ré — Flat

• 9 September: Stage 11 — 167km — Châtelaillon-Plageto Poitiers — Flat

• 10 September: Stage 12 — 218km — Chauvigny toSarran Corrèze — Hilly

• 11 September: Stage 13 — 191km — Châtel-Guyon toPuy Mary Cantal — Mountain

• 12 September: Stage 14 — 197km — Clermont-Ferrand to Lyon — Flat

• 13 September: Stage 15 — 175km — Lyon > Grand Colombier — Mountain

• 14 September: Rest — Isère

• 15 September: Stage 16 — 164km — La Tour-du-Pin toVillard-de-Lans — Mountain

• 16 September: Stage 17 — 168km — Grenoble toMéribel Col de la Loze — Mountain

• 17 September: Stage 18 — 168km — Méribel > La Roche-sur-Foron — Mountain

• 18 September: Stage 19 — 160km — Bourg-en-Bresseto Champagnole — Flat

• 19 September: Stage 20 — 36km — Lure to La Planchedes Belles Filles — Individual time-trial

• 20 September: Stage 21 — 122km — Mantes-la-Jolie > Paris Champs-Élysées — Flat

Who are the favourites?

With the widespread cancellation of stage racing events, it’s hard to know what form this year’s riders are in and therefore who’s looking likely to win the yellow jersey. 

However, the current favourite is last year’s Tour de France winner, Egan Bernal, who came 4th in February’s Tour Colombia. Having recently taken part in Slovenia’s National Championships Road Race and ITT, in which he placed 1st and 2nd respectively, Primoz Roglic is also attracting the attention of bookmakers.

Four-time Tour de France winner Chris Froome is also up there, despite uncertainty over his place in Team Ineos (whose name changes to Ineos Grenadiers as of 29 August). Following injuries in June 2019 and his announcement of a move to Israel Start-Up Nation in 2021, there are suggestions that Egan Bernal and 2018 winner Geraint Thomas will instead be chosen as leaders.

Categories: Cycling

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