Crossing Europe on a Bike Called Reggie

I have written a book – Crossing Europe on a Bike Called Reggie – about my cycle along the Eurovelo 5 from Reading to Brindisi. It is available for download for reading on Kindle, PC, iPad, iPhone, iPod, Android & Mac. The following links will take you directly to Amazon sites where you can pay in pounds, dollars or euros depending upon where you live;

Amazon – UK

Amazon – USA

Amazon – Germany

Amazon – France

On the following pages, you can read about the section of the journey from leaving Luxembourg until arrival in the small town of Hunningue on the Franco-Swiss border. The extract also includes a description of my day off the saddle in the French city of Strasbourg. I hope you enjoy reading what I have written. Any feedback would be much appreciated!

Cycling Day 8: Luxembourg to Metz

Cycling Day 9: Metz to Dabo

Cycling Day 10: Dabo to Strasbourg

Rest Day 2: Strasbourg

Cycling Day 11: Strasbourg to Colmar

Cycling Day 12: Colmar to Hunningue

For the story of the rest of the journey, you’ll have to invest in the book itself!

Andrew

P.S. Apologies for the lack of italics or justification in the text; copying from Microsoft Word into WordPress is not an easy process and some things have to go I’m afraid!

apsykes@hotmail.com

Here’s the TV advert:

21 responses to “Crossing Europe on a Bike Called Reggie

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  7. Hiya Andrew- ive done three trips to Portugal, the latest in jan this yr via the West coast. Great rides- the East coast is a lot easier but i keep losing too much weight. Getting too old and discovered this long distance far too late in life, im hoping to ride until they nail my coffin lid shut! Keep your wheels turning broth’
    john Adrian Short- author, Bins, Benches and Broken Bikes.

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  13. Well done, Andrew, sounds like my own travels in the distant past and all I can say is I can’t wait to get a copy of the book!

    • Thanks Bill. Have you met, per chance my other famous blog reader & traveller, the one and only Michael Palin? I should put you both in touch with my cousin Richard who lives in a lovely little corner of Portugal; you could write the book and Michael could front the TV documentary all about Coimbra…
      Best wishes
      Andrew

      • Thanks Andrew. Yes, as it happens I know Mike well, having been a Monty Python fan since early days. And by chance I happened to bump into your cousin in Spain last week (we were at the same hotel) during the Holy Week celebrations in Cordoba. As such, and thanks to his enthusiasm, a visit to Portugal is next on my list.

  14. LEJOG or JOGLE taking in the most easterly (Lowestoft) and the most westerly points (Ardnamurchan Point) of the mainland too. That should be ablout 2000 miles.

    Or

    LEJOG or JOGLE and top the three peaks during the cycle?

    • Mmm… quite like the idea of these twists to the standard route. What about the direction? north-south or south-north? When I cycled the Pennine Cycleway in 2009 the suggestion was to go south-north so as not to fight the prevailing winds but I went north-south and never found it a problem…

      • As you say the prevaling wind is supposed to come in from the south west so some people say it is easier to ride with that behind you. But the weather doesn’t always stick to the rules! Having said that I found that it generally did do what is should do but don’t know how bad it might have been travelling into what wind there was. I’d probably go with the direction that suits travel needs best. Is it easier to end at Lands End ot John O’ Groats? That’s what I’d work round.

  15. If you are looking for cycling then there might be some trips of interest on this website:

    http://www.tra-velo-gue.co.uk/

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